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LAND USE AND ACCESS STUDY

The areas around the I-69 exits 14 and 22 are expected to undergo significant growth in the near future. New development may consist of anything from gas stations and restaurants to new residential developments, offices, or industrial buildings. The roads in these areas, and the way they are or will be configured, will influence what is developed there, and new developments will influence traffic patterns on these roads. It is, therefore, prudent to examine how decisions made now will affect development and traffic in the future.

This study will create a series of scenarios - using state of the art visualization techniques - to demonstrate what types of development may result from different decisions. Its ultimate aim is to help develop a transportation system that functions well in terms of safety and mobility, fits its physical setting, and preserves scenic, aesthetic, historic, and environmental resources. It also seeks to strike a balance between the needs and preferences of current and future residents.

 

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The planning team consulted with government officials and agencies, citizens and utility providers in gathering data to be analyzed for the development of this plan. Data collected and analyzed included:

1. Current and Future Land Use

2. Zoning

3. Volume Counts

4. Forecast Data

5. Road Inventories

Experience shows that the planning of state highways and adjoining land uses needs to be coordinated to ensure a smooth fit between the highway configuration and existing and proposed developments. State highways are designed to increase mobility for through traffic; they provide limited access from local streets in order to limit the load of ‘local traffic’. Development will benefit from locating along highways, having visual access but indirect vehicular access through local collector streets. When a suitable balance between these interests is not reached, highways give way to local travel, resulting in new congestion and safety issues, and the need for further transportation investments.

 
 
 
     
© 2009 The Madison County Council of Governments